Isadora Duncan: Landscapes of the Soul weaves dance, music, and spoken word into a fast-paced performance. It features Duncan’s masterful and historic choreography to Fredric Chopin’s celebrated composition The 24 Preludes, played live by renowned pianist Carlo Rodrigues. These iconic dances are performed by award-winning Word Dance Theater, whose dancers are trained in the choreography and technique of Duncan and have performed Duncan’s powerful work to great acclaim nationally and internationally. The dance and music are interwoven with stories drawn from the news that explore the power, beauty, brokenness, and triumph of the human soul. Never more relevant than NOW!

Presented on July 12, 15, 21, 25, 26, 2018 in partnership with Capital Fringe Festival.

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

 
Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham

Photo by Gail Bingham


The Production Team

Concept: Cynthia Word
Choreography: Isadora Duncan
Costume Design: Judith Hansen
Light Design: Brandi Martin
Text Adaptation: Cynthia Word with inspiration from stories in The Washington Post
Stage Management: Michelle Janota
Crew: Devin Kohn

The Artists

Dancers and Storytellers: Jordan Gehley, Hannah Goldberg, Jenifer Golden, Rebecca Lallande, Cynthia Word, Ingrid Zimmer
Pianist: Carlos Cesar Rodriguez


Reviews

“As the preludes built toward their final wrenching chords, the three women danced in succession, leaping, spiraling and turning in near ecstatic reverie. Throughout, the spoken-word sections alluded to contemporary struggles—the loss of a teacher to gun violence, a witness to people dying in a refugee camp—and triumphs of the spirit.”
- Lisa Traiger, 
DC Metro Theater Arts. 

“But this version, with these textual embeddings, is a new experiment, and a reasonably successful one. Duncan’s choreography may be historic, but it converses fluently with the here and now.”
- Celia Wren, 
The Washington Post